For a Critique of Carbon Trading Dogma

by Emanuele Leonardi* Market fundamentalism must be reversed if a politically sound solution to climate change is to be found. From this perspective, Cop 21 will not deliver. As expected, there was much talk about the ongoing Cop 21 in Paris. Most of it concentrated on the geopolitical dimension of climate negotiations: for example, Jason … Continue reading For a Critique of Carbon Trading Dogma

“At least it is one step forward”: A dispatch from COP21

by Ethemcan Turhan* It is high time that political ecology problematizes the corporate show from the inside out and reclaims its well-deserved status in these meetings. It is an interesting feeling to be at a multilateral environmental conference that gathers 20.000 accredited participants, 6.000 police for security checks, 3.000 journalists and is told to be … Continue reading “At least it is one step forward”: A dispatch from COP21

War and cover up in the Amazon

FUNAI, Brazil's National Indigenous Foundation, is accused of ignoring a serious conflict between two indigenous tribes in the Amazon. Two hours after the original version of this text was published in Carta Capital, FUNAI informs about first contact omitting information about massacre. A “tribal war,” following the omission of the state, reportedly provoked a massacre of members of the … Continue reading War and cover up in the Amazon

The Damage Done and the Dams to Come

By Matthäus Rest, Austin Lord & Christopher Butler *. In the aftermath of the 2015 earthquakes, progress toward the stated aim of turning Nepal into a ‘hydropower nation’ has been stalled. How will concerns over heightened risk affect hydropower development in Nepal in the medium and long term? [A shorter version of this article was … Continue reading The Damage Done and the Dams to Come

Langtang: Reflections on the 2015 Earthquakes in Nepal

By Austin Lord*. The tragedy at Langtang is a prism that reflects the risks and pressures experienced more broadly by mountain communities across Nepal. [This article was first published on 14 October 2015 in Cultural Anthropology as part of the series Aftershocked: Reflections on the 2015 Earthquakes in Nepal.] Some forty-nine days after the earthquake … Continue reading Langtang: Reflections on the 2015 Earthquakes in Nepal

Latin American political ecology according to the Progresistas Bolivarianos

By Carmelo Ruiz* The region’s progressive governments are hardening their positions in favour of mining and oil extraction and against civil society environmental organizations and other critics of extractivism. The recent threats against non-governmental society organizations (NGOs) made by the avowedly progressive and environmentally-minded governments of Ecuador and Bolivia have caused commotion and discussion among academics and activists in … Continue reading Latin American political ecology according to the Progresistas Bolivarianos

The ‘Blue Heart of Europe’ beats in the Balkans

Europe’s last wild rivers are under threat from dam construction—yet hardly anyone is aware of it. Ten days ago I defied train cancellations and border restrictions in Central and South-Eastern Europe to make my way to Belgrade, Serbia, where the Balkan Rivers Days took place from 25 to 27 September. The meeting was organized by the … Continue reading The ‘Blue Heart of Europe’ beats in the Balkans

The feelings of a Turk (or a Greek): Mustafa, or the emotional and the political

by Christos Zografos* An unexpected meeting during a fieldtrip forges connections across the border, stirs historical memories, and stimulates reflections about dispossession, mobilisation and the relevance of the emotional in political ecology. It’s a June midday, and the sun is burning hot on my head. We have come to the small village of Yeniköy, an … Continue reading The feelings of a Turk (or a Greek): Mustafa, or the emotional and the political

The Political Ecology of Everyday Life under Settler Colonialism III – Reporting from Palestine

The Jordan Valley, in the northeast of the West Bank, is another area emblematic of the injustices Israeli occupation and settler colonialism are inflicting on Palestinians. It also showcases the dramatic extent of Israel’s water enclosures. This is the third part of a series by ENTITLE fellows on our experiences during the International Conference of … Continue reading The Political Ecology of Everyday Life under Settler Colonialism III – Reporting from Palestine

The Political Ecology of Everyday Life under Settler Colonialism II – Reporting from Palestine

By Melissa García Lamarca Picking up from the first post by several ENTITLE fellows on our experiences in Palestine at the International Conference of Critical Geography, this post focuses on dispossession, appropriation and the erasure of (certain) histories in the city of Jaffa. Traveling from Ramallah to Jaffa: a lesson on dispossession through cement As … Continue reading The Political Ecology of Everyday Life under Settler Colonialism II – Reporting from Palestine