A conversation with Rob Nixon

by Salvatore De Rosa, Felipe Milanez and Gustavo García López During the Tales from Planet Earth film festival that was held in Stockholm in April 2014, we had the possibility to share a coffee and a free-floating conversation with Professor Rob Nixon, author of the acclaimed book 'Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor'. … Continue reading A conversation with Rob Nixon

Rural and Urban Solidarity Arises Against Istanbul Megaprojects

By Eleanor Finley* In the summer of 2013, popular resistance succeeded in stopping the demolition of Gezi Park, one of the last public green spaces in Istanbul. Yet urban transformation and development projects have continued throughout the city at a dizzying pace. Nearly every neighbourhood in Istanbul today grapples with some new high-rise, luxury apartment … Continue reading Rural and Urban Solidarity Arises Against Istanbul Megaprojects

Photographies of an ancestral present

By Sofia Roque* Will beauty save the world? Génesis, the last work of the photographer Sebastião Salgado, is a call for a battle to save the planet. Beyond the borders of an untouched or exotic nature, the ambiguity of a switched time reminds us of our collective belonging and common struggles. Can a photograph of an … Continue reading Photographies of an ancestral present

“Fifty shades of green”: Bruno Latour on the ecomodernist manifesto

by Bruno Latour* Presentation to the panel on modernism at the Breakthrough Dialogue, Sausalito, June 2015 Wake up you ecomoderns, we are in the Anthropocene, not in the Holocene, nor are we to ever reside in the enchanted dream of futurism. Down to earth is the message I hear, but unfortunately not in the ecomodernist manifesto. There is one … Continue reading “Fifty shades of green”: Bruno Latour on the ecomodernist manifesto

Love your symptoms: A sympathetic diagnosis of the Ecomodernist Manifesto

*by Paul Robbins and Sarah A. Moore Amidst - and despite - its deep-seated rejection of technocratic fixes, can political ecology reconcile itself with ecomodernism? The Ecomodernist Manifesto is a brash, unapologetic, optimistic, and strikingly accessible text, one that stresses the emancipatory power of human imagination, realized predominantly through large-scale, centralized energy technology. The always-emergent … Continue reading Love your symptoms: A sympathetic diagnosis of the Ecomodernist Manifesto

Brewing traditions: performing cultural authenticity around whaling

by Benedict Singleton* The use of an unusual ingredient in an Icelandic beer this year highlights the changing nature of tradition and culture. Some environmental conflicts involve traditional or cultural practices. In such circumstances, actors on both sides utilise a range of arguments about the authenticity of said practices. This is certainly the case in … Continue reading Brewing traditions: performing cultural authenticity around whaling

Gudynas: Thinking like Araucarias: development and conservation in other timescales

by Eduardo Gudynas* The dramatic loss of forests in Southern Chile and Argentina challenges classical environmental policies. Their recovery requires environmental planning in the time scale of centuries and even beyond one thousand years. But the time scales considered under present-day development hardly deal with a few years of recovery. Consequently, an effective conservation requires … Continue reading Gudynas: Thinking like Araucarias: development and conservation in other timescales

Simplifying narratives: cetacean excretion, whaling politics and climate change

by Benedict Singleton* Can scientific knowledge on the bowel movements of whales help to address climate change? As the history of the whaling debate shows, there are risks to simplistic narratives. Recent scientific research on marine mammals has created a growing body of knowledge about whale toilet habits. Simplifying greatly, whale movement between the depths of the … Continue reading Simplifying narratives: cetacean excretion, whaling politics and climate change

Making ourselves indigenous: on conservation ethics and the commons

by Stefania Barca* Last October, the journal Environmental History published a special section to commemorate 50 years of the USA Wilderness Protection Act (3 September 1964), and organized an online forum with commentaries by seven scholars. Though not an expert in the history of natural parks, I welcomed this opportunity to discuss some key ideas … Continue reading Making ourselves indigenous: on conservation ethics and the commons